Brown Bess re-stocked by Dutch influenced smith

This Brown Bess musket likely came across the sea from England in the first half of the  1700's just in time for the French and Indian War. It was badly used during that desperate time and ended up a wreck. No one in that day wasted anything. It ended up in the hands of a North-eastern smith with a Dutch heritage ,who created an elegant sporting fowler, often also used as a militia musket. thus the fish belly butt-stock. All the Bess parts are present, The barrel is of course Bess’s original 77 caliber, 44″ long , the lock is an early 1828 ‘Dublin Castle’, the brass furniture is also early,  except for a few screws,  matching the lock, except for the ramrod and ferrules which are Jaeger like with wooden ramrod. Such guns were made for both sporting and militia use, as most gun owners did both in the early days. A plug bayonet comes with it.  The fat-sparking lock is an early banana shaped classic made in Dublin. The stock is great quality tigered maple, a wood the smith could easily find. The ramrod is hickory. Later ramrods were skinny steel. An early muzzle fitting bayonet is included along with a primitive sheath,  as most colonists of that early time both hunted and served in the local militia with the same gun. This reproduction is brand new, never fired, crafted by Doc White in honor of his Dutch progenitors who colonized New Amsterdam before it became English. It likely saw action at Burgoyne's Blunder and Bunker Hill.  A  solid 75 caliber ball topped by three small shot made a mean load. Don't shoot 'til you see the whites of their eyes!

Actually an early Brown Bess musket, restocked by a hometown smith in the Old Northeast with strong Dutch influence, as if the original musket somehow lost its original stock and the parts were re-assembled by a Dutch influenced smith   The maple is just gorgeous!!! It will end up finished dark with Aqua Fortis, oil  and elbow grease.

Price on request or best offer